Writing Process

 

My writing process tends to be very organized. I always feel that if I don’t think about how my writing will look right before I publish it, I won’t know what I need to do to make it the best it can be. I start with the information in front of me (book, article, website), look at the criteria to get the best grade, and outline where I need to b with my writing at each step in the process. One time I had a lo book report to do and didn’t know where to start. Instead of creating a plan, I just worked on it as I went along and did not get the best grade. Reading Flowers and Hayes’ article made me think about all the techniques I used like pre-writing and revising, but unlike what the article stated, I do usually write in order of the process just because I am more used to it than writing in a free-spirited way.

There are many characteristics of novice writers that I used to possess in high school because I simply did not want to write long essays and research papers. However, since I have had to do even longer writing in college, I have learned how to take a more professional approach. Novice writers lose basic skills, like noticing simple grammar errors, using correct punctuation or syntax. Fortunately, I was always able  to point out these errors, so by the time I was in college, it was never a problem. Novice writers fail to elaborate points that make their writing seem professional and instead come out incomplete and lazy. This, however, was very hard for me in hard school because I did not know what I needed to add or how to incorporate it into my writing. In college, I learned that references can make your writing more believable if you have evidence that you understood what you were reading. Most high school students, who are usually novice writers, feel tyrannized by their assignments. They follow the instructions almost exactly, only wording it differently so it sounds like their own writing. I often would do this because I did not know how to answer the prompt in the way the teacher wanted. In my college English classers, I learned about why the teacher would assign the prompt, especially since I want to be a teacher myself. Thinking about what the teacher wanted me to learn from the assignment gave a different perspective of what I needed to do to in order to be a better writer.There are many characteristics of novice writers that I used to possess in high school because I simply did not want to write long essays and research papers. However, since I have had to do even longer writing in college, I have learned how to take a more professional approach. Novice writers lose basic skills, like noticing simple grammar errors, using correct punctuation or syntax. Fortunately, I was always able  to point out these errors, so by the time I was in college, it was never a problem. Novice writers fail to elaborate points that make their writing seem professional and instead come out incomplete and lazy. This, however, was very hard for me in hard school because I did not know what I needed to add or how to incorporate it into my writing. In college, I learned that references can make your writing more believable if you have evidence that you understood what you were reading. Most high school students, who are usually novice writers, feel tyrannized by their assignments. They follow the instructions almost exactly, only wording it differently so it sounds like their own writing. I often would do this because I did not know how to answer the prompt int he way the teacher wanted. In my college English classers, I learned about why the teacher would assign the prompt, especially since I want to be a teacher myself. Thinking about what the teacher wanted me to learn from the assignment gave a different perspective of what I needed to do to in order to be a better writer.There are many characteristics of novice writers that I used to possess in high school because I simply did not want to write long essays and research papers. However, since I have had to do even longer writing in college, I have learned how to take a more professional approach. Novice writers lose basic skills, like noticing simple grammar errors, using correct punctuation or syntax. Fortunately, I was always able to point out these errors, so by the time I was in college, it was never a problem. Novice writers fail to elaborate points that make their writing seem professional and instead come out incomplete and lazy. This, however, was very hard for me in hard school because I did not know what I needed to add or how to incorporate it into my writing. In college, I learned that references can make your writing more believable if you have evidence that you understood what you were reading. Most high school students, who are usually novice writers, feel tyrannized by their assignments. They follow the instructions almost exactly, only wording it differently so it sounds like their own writing. I often would do this because I did not know how to answer the prompt int he way the teacher wanted. In my college English classers, I learned about why the teacher would assign the prompt, especially since I want to be a teacher myself. Thinking about what the teacher wanted me to learn from the assignment gave a different perspective of what I needed to do to in order to be a better writer.

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4 comments

  1. EmilyB · February 24, 2016

    I was a bit of a rebel in high school. I didn’t like following the “rules” of writing so I didn’t really follow them. I never had much of an issue though because my ideas still came through. My teachers always just told me to work on organization. As I got into college my writing has flourished as I’ve adopted new ways of organizing my thoughts. It seems my process is quiet different than yours, which I actually think is great! Everyone has a way that works best for them. It’s good to see another perspective of how someone does something and why. It made me reflect on my own writing.

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  2. Max Thiede · February 25, 2016

    I really found this to be pretty darn interesting, as I don’t like to plan things that much, even though I know being a teacher is a LOT of planning. I do agree with the difficulty of trying to succeed without a plan. I prefer to do trials by fire, but that is absolutely not a good idea for students who care deeply about their grade. It’s really important to realize that everyone likes things in a different way.

    Like

  3. cmddancer · March 7, 2016

    I really like how you compared your writing process now to how it was as a young writer. Remembering your process as a high school students will help you when working with your future students, especially those who need support with their writing, unlike those who may write their essays on the bus and still get “A”s. Those student will need a different sort of support.

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